About this talk

Running time: 28 minutes

Edward Cullinan, RIBA Gold Medal Award winner in 2007, was born in 1931. He trained at Cambridge, the Architectural Association and Berkeley before starting to practice in 1957. His office is run as a co-operative. He has taught in England and North America, and his projects have been widely published and exhibited and have received a number of awards.

His architecture has firm roots in the Modern movement, both in its design philosophy, and in its sense of social responsibility. But he stresses simplicity of technique rather than of form, believing that it is the expression of its construction that gives a building its meaning.

The clarity of the thinking behind his own designs is apparent in this presentation of architectural development between about 1850 and 1960. He looks at the period not as traditional history, but through the ideas that informed certain key buildings, seen against their social background and studied through the eyes of an architect and builder. His aim has been to develop a clear description of a few simple ideas and one dominant one, the interconnection of spaces and places.

This talk is in three parts, with this part dealing with the period 1900 - 1910. Part 1, covering 1850 - 1895 can be found here: Red House To Ronchamp: Part 1 (1850 - 1895), while Part 3, covering 1920 - 1960 is here: Red House To Ronchamp: Part 3 (1920 - 1960).

Please note that a transcript of this talk is available - please contact us for further details.

Edward Cullinan


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